Thought Starters

Does Design Matter when you are buying a Toaster?

Does a well designed toaster make toast as well as a discount special?

  • Do you own a toaster?
  • How about a coffee maker?
  • Or do you own a vacuum cleaner?

What do they look like? How do they function? Are they easy to use? Is everything working the way you expected it to? How’s the quality?

It’s just a damn appliance, man.

And that’s where the trouble starts with our understanding of the value of design.

I am poking around this issue and asking these questions because on Saturday evening this past week I was in a pub with 3 other interior designers discussing the merits of design and its importance to our world. The discussion went in a few directions but we settled on a comparative of European culture versus North American culture.

Most people are fully aware of the fundamental differences between both cultures but the thing that may not be obvious is the difference between how each continent’s culture values design. In Europe, simple products such as toasters, coffee makers and vacuum cleaners are less likely to be disregarded when it comes to quality and the reputation of the company to bring good design aesthetic to their product.

Take a look that these examples:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the surface what seems abundantly clear is the importance design plays in the development of the products. It doesn’t appear as an afterthought but more like a key part of the development process, culture and values of the company.

Great design is not defined by its resultant aesthetic. Clean, simple functionality devoid of excess are key principles in creating good design and are where the resulting aesthetic is derived. Great design takes time and time seems to be the key driver to market for many North American consumer products.

Time drives iteration and iteration drives quality.

Quality drive cost.

Cost is a considerable factor in product development and certainly drives every buying decision a consumer makes but if cost is considered in context of the lifespan of a well designed product versus the replacement value in the short term it starts to becomes negligible. Cost is a key differentiator between how North American consumers are enticed to makes purchases versus their European counterparts. While we North Americans are primarily enticed by the sale (discount, deals, incentives) the basic drivers in European culture seem very different. Sure, passing up a great deal seems ridiculous but design, quality and workmanship take more of a leading role in driving the decision of the average European consumer to make a purchase.

Where did we go wrong in North America?

It seems that the general public in North America does not readily accept the value that well designed product brings to their lives and that design does not need to be exclusive to the “well to do.” The general vernacular is that if it looks great it must be really expensive and if so not necessary as a purchase. Why should you purchase that well designed and aesthetically pleasing toaster when you can pay a third of the cost for the Wal-Mart version?

Toast isn’t just toast.

This issue is bread into us at a very early age and is not exclusive to consumer goods. The consulting industry runs rampant with this attitude; faster and cheaper than the next guy. We learn that very early in life. We hurry from one job to the next, one project to the next and one idea to the next each of us looking for ways to cut costs and save time. Very rarely does time allow us to focus on design aesthetic, design sensibility and design thinking to drive the output of a product be it a toaster, a chair or a building. We are constantly pushing ourselves to get it done quicker and cheaper.

Time is money.

Quality, the last bastion of hope for good design, is suffering in a corner by itself wondering where all its friends have gone.

While travelling in Europe recently we sensed that feeling for the love of design in almost everything people do. It simply seems that European culture values the time it takes to produce something of value and that quality is critical to living life. It seems ingrained in their culture.

The simplicity of action, the time taken to study shape, functionality and the attitude that the design of a product, system or space requires iteration and attention to detail which is often lost in North American society’s rush to beat the market.

As designers this attitude goes against our core principles yet we consistently find ourselves caught in its web. Designers become designers because at some point in their young lives they fell in love with the ideals that great design brings to the world.

What can we do to maintain that perspective?

Please watch this trailer.

It’s for a documentary film called Objectified.

Now you may argue the term objectified holds a derogatory connotation in the sense of seeing something for its surface beauty (aesthetic) and not the beauty from within (value) but this is simply not the case. The film demonstrates the value of the design process and how good design can affect the world in a positive manner. It allows you to discover the passion that design can demonstrate in a product and hopefully translates that passion back to you to use in your world.

It did that for me.

So, as a fellow consumer, have I even come close to convincing you to at least examine the possibilities that good design brings to our everyday world?

What would it take for you to see the value in the iterative process that drives the value of a well designed product?

What’s in it for me?

Nothing more than showing you the power design holds and how it can change your view on how you live in the world around you.

 

 

 

 

About this Author: Ralph Dopping (198 Posts)

A quirky sense-o-humour coupled with an indelible sense of stylish sarcasm makes it difficult to take the world too seriously doesn't it? My faves: fun, passion and hard work. I work here everyday: www.designdialog.ca


37 comments
wonderoftech
wonderoftech

Hi Ralph, I think about design a lot. Target has a line of home products that are designed by a famous architect. They fall apart quickly, but you can admire their looks in the trash bin.

 

I'm with Josh, function over form. I agree with you and the Objectified trailer though. Design often can indicate that thought went into the construction of a product.

 

I find this to be especially true with websites. A well-designed website can indicate a quality product or service. I recently reviewed a gift-giving website called Wantful that has a beautiful website. It was named one of the 50 best websites in 2012 by Time Magazine. Sure enough, they offer quality products and service.

 

Will I pay more for a well-designed product? Yes, but only if performance isn't compromised.

 

 

kellysem
kellysem

If we're going to live sustainably at all we're going to have to stop buying and discarding toasters every few years. Longevity is going to have to be the next focus of design efforts. Why can't we design a toaster that lasts 100 years or longer? We have the technology, design skill and materials. The only thing missing is a change of attitude that makes it okay (and desirable) to pass down a toaster, as you would an heirloom, to our children and grandchildren.

Faryna
Faryna

Ralph,

 

We should hang more. I like design. You like design. We could talk...

 

Lots of stuff here for me to get into with you - like a man, like a best friend - not like a clinical happy faced, social suck up.

 

1. Exciting product designs tend to disappoint - most people don't know it until they spent the money. 

 

I have the following Porsche Design products:

 

a. Coffee Maker and Hot Water Boiler - sucks and replaced by the Walmart equivalents

b. Several lighters - sucks

c. Kitchen stove top and vent - sucks

d. Kitchen sink - sucks

e. Miscellaneous - sucks

 

Literally, $10,000 wasted on things that lack quality of construction and performance

 

I won't even get into how the design of a Porsche interior has always been lackluster.

 

But it's not always a bad ride [pun intended] when it comes to "designed" products.

 

Some of my thumbs ups go to Phillipe Stark. No time to list the others, sorry.

 

2. Quality does not necessarily drive cost.

 

a. Doing things differently, pursuing a new or untraditional take, discovery, creative think, and presentation are bigger drivers of cost than materials, production, standard marketing and distribution.

 

b. Pricing is often used to establish status, create exclusivity, limit access, and fuel envy. Profit and maximum market reach are not always the objective.

 

c. Quality means different things to different people.

 

3. Disposable Economies

 

Things are designed to fail faster to ensure future purchase - a misuse of design IMHO

 

4. Too often - less design resources are brought to bear on North American products as opposed to European and Asian products

 

Apple is a wonderful counterpoint to this North American dilemma.

 

 

ur_Yupgi
ur_Yupgi

in terms of connections and details, how does the fields of industrial designers and architects differ? and what will delineate the difference between them in the near future?

ExtremelyAvg
ExtremelyAvg

I nearly always choose based upon quality over price and sometimes form over functionality. I've never been disappointed when I went with the higher end item.

 

I bought a water bottle three months ago, for $32.00. It is made of glass, so I can't take it running or really anywhere. It has a screw on lid, so it isn't especially easy to use, but it also has an interior wall which prevents condensation. It is very pretty.

 

The result: I love it! I drink vastly more water at home than I used to, so I'm buying much less Diet Mountain Dew. I figured out the other day that it has paid for itself, just on the avoidance of soda costs. I love Diet Dew, but now I like water as much.

 

There is nothing logical about my purchase, despite my attempts to justify it with soda savings, because at the time, I had no idea it would change my beverage drinking habits. I really bought it because of the design.

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AnnaMarieHubbard
AnnaMarieHubbard

Hi RD, you could have easily put 'universal' in front of the word design in your discussion, functional, simple, intuitive use...

 

Joshua Wilner/A Writer Writes
Joshua Wilner/A Writer Writes

Design isn't as important to me as functionality and whether it gets the job done. I am willing to pay for quality but only if the functionality is a part of it.

Jeevanjacobjohn
Jeevanjacobjohn

Design matters. A lot.

 

But, does that mean we should all go shiny and try to design products (if we are going to)? Nope, right?

 

These days, people seems to be looking for deals, cheaper goods rather than the products of quality and high value (what people want, especially in the Americas - is quick fixes, right?)

 

I think that both matters. The price needs to get lower, but at the same time, we should have quality goods (over time, I think it will add up as more businesses will be forced to provide quality goods for cheaper prices - or would something bad happen? Like those businesses choosing to produce lower quality goods to survive?)

 

Who knows?

 

I usually like to keep everything simple - especially, when it comes to design (not too shiny or anything, but at the same time enjoyable and aesthetically pleasing).

 

Wow, those toasters and coffee makers look awesome ;) I haven't seen any of those in US or in India (well, in India, things are a lot different because the entire concept of design is different - thanks to all the empires that existed there and thanks to the difference in culture between each states).

barrettrossie
barrettrossie

I'll be the contrarian. (Must I? Again? Heck yeah! Oh, well maybe just a bit...)

 

I'll grant that beautifully designed products are often high quality. 

 

But design can be used as a cheap come-on, as well.  It's been a few years since I was in an IKEA store. It was full of crap that was destined for the landfill next time you move to a new apartment. The Palo Alto California landfill is full of CCS (cheap crap from Sweden). 

 

 @Danny Brown and @Late_Bloomers love their Dysons, but Consumer Reports tells me a low-cost Eureka works better. The Dyson isn't good at pet hair - so they say, Danny and LB, please tell me if that's wrong - so there's no place for it here amongst our four cats. 

 

And would you rather spend your hard earned Canadian bucks on a Jaguar or a Camry? Well, fine, go turn heads in your Jag. You can borrow the Camry when yours in the shop. 

 

(I know the Jags are much better these days, but those beautiful rides were a mechanical and electrical disaster for what, 40 years?) 

 

I guess it depends how you define design.

 

I have to go now and make a smoothie with my Kitchen Aid blender. 

Late_Bloomers
Late_Bloomers

If I were to pick the three proverbial items to that deserted island, my choice would be: my Dyson (imagine all the sand in my lovely Wright building), my de Longhi coffee machine and my iPad. See how possessive I am about my design products? And what do they have in common: they are aesthetically pleasing to look at, they work to my continuing satisfaction at a high performance level and never let me down. They might be more expensive but they have a higher life expectancy and when they need repairs or revision I can count on their being made as good as new. In the long run it pays off economically to buy quality products and it makes me feel good to be part of a waste not community.

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AnneReuss
AnneReuss

Love it! You've got me really thinking how we can improve this.  The user experience with physical objects ignites all kinds of good feelings. I can't put my finger on exactly what that good feeling is! Our senses are constantly absorbing and analyzing different stimulations - why can't a well designed chair or toaster add some delight on top of functionality to our day? 

 

Kudos to Fast Company for their Innovation by Design issue - it wasn't all technology! 

Danny Brown
Danny Brown

I used a Hoover vacuum cleaner for years, then got a Dyson. Never looked back, and when the ball roller version came out? Hooya! Same goes for my dedicated espresso machine versus a coffee maker that does espresso. Aesthetics aren't everything but when something works perfectly the way it should, it's usually because the design is more than just the inner workings. Thoughtful stuff, mate, cheers!

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Caitlin Kelly
Caitlin Kelly

I'm still using the battered Braun juicer I've had for more than 20 years. It works extremely well and, like all Braun designs, is perfect. 

 

Our inability to appreciate and value great design may start in our education -- when and where (if ever) is it even mentioned or discussed as we go through elementary or secondary school? We learn history, geography, math, politics....but not the very basic fact that everything we use (as this doc points out) was designed and manufactured by someone, or several people. Like engineering, another field of study that underpins everything we use and touch, design seems to be visible only to its acolytes and practitioners who all preach to the choir. I am passionate about design, but to people who have never studied it or thought about it, it's abstract, artsy and effete...Designers need to do a much better job (?) explaining their value to the culture, perhaps...

 

The only sort of design that civilians probably get is car design, something we can all relate to...

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @kellysem Agree, to me the first step in this type of evolution is changing the attitude of a disposable economy. The challenge is how to convince people who live in this world of oversaturated media bombarded daily with something new, better, faster, cheaper that a product with longevity holds value. Grass roots is always viable and change takes time but currently product is typically designed with a short lifecycle.

 

I mentioned to my friend @barrettrossie we have a 27 year old Kenmore vacuum. Handing it down does not seem viable but the premise is the same. We have chosen not to replace it but it doesn't get the exposure to lifestyle that a kitchen appliance, car or home gets for that matter. Success is still and likely will be seen as shiny new things. Consumer electronics likely drive the charge on the viability to replace the content of our lives over and over.

 

I don't have the answer but would love to continue the discussion. Cheers and thank you so much for coming by and offering your insight.

barrettrossie
barrettrossie

@ExtremelyAvg Brian, that water bill may save you a zillion dollars in medical bills down the road! My wife loves the Dew too (the Throwback version with no high-fructose corn syrup) but anything that can set you up with nature's own diet drink is a blessing.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @ExtremelyAvg Great approach Brian. You may be downplaying your choice a bit but regardless you chose something because it suited your purpose.

 

I won't sit here and say a well designed product can change your life but I will say that well designed products serve their function well. What's interesting is the intent for your water bottle. if you had said you bought it only to go running and it was designed for that purpose the solution would not be functional and thereby not well designed for its purpose regardless whether it is aesthetically pleasing.

 

Never really did the Dew but I saw an ad where a guy swings from a crane into a giant balloon filled with the Dew and comes away loving it might which entice me to give it a try. 

 

Thanks for your comments. Much appreciated. 

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @AnnaMarieHubbard Yes I could have but that is a subject left to the experts. Now, if you choose i would be happy to publish a piece here that you write. Think about it and let me know.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

Good answer  @Josh/ http://joshuawilner.com/  Good design = functionality. If a product is designed well with good materials in a manner that makes it easy to use for the consumer then it is designed well but only one aspect of design is aesthetic.

 

There is some argument here in the comments such as from @barrettrossie that design aesthetic is empty and functionality is the key factor to the usefulness of a product. Good arguement but good design emcompasses functionality, quality and aesthetic of which all three take effort to produce.

 

Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts! Appreciated.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

Thanks  @Jeevanjacobjohn I would be interested in how the Indian culture sees design. You mentioned that the concept of design is different there and that makes me wonder.

 

I agree with you comments that simplicity begets good results and yields great design but development cost would certainly be a factor when iteration is necessary to get the best solution produced. Lower cost typically means lower quality materials and cut corners thereby negating the idea of quality and workmanship.

 

Thanks for stopping by. i would love to hear more about you thoughts on design in India. Cheers, sir.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @barrettrossie  @Danny Brown  @Late_Bloomers Hey Barrett, I too love a challenge. Thanks barbara for piping in. You know, this is the express reason why I started blogging. Healthy debate and in writing it allows you to spend the time to forma decent response.

 

You doufus! Hahahaha......just kidding.

 

I hear you on the Jaguars. I love the look of a Jag. Sexy, sleek, fast. The have captured the essence of the aminal well in the design of the car's "look" but the design clearly leaves something on the table. Great design, as I mentioned above to @Josh/ http://joshuawilner.com/ ,  is the culmination of quality, functionality and aesthetic. Clearly, Jaguar's engineering was not the prime focus and hey, let's face it, the brits can't design cars. Their focus leaned toward aesthetic. Great design? Not so much.

 

You can certainly feel your Eurkea vacuum is well designed. If it is well made, functions well and appeals to you then it is designed to do what it should. Suck! We have a 27 year old Kenmore vacuum which still works. Does it perform as well as a Dyson. No and it is nothing much to look at. The fact that it still works is an amazing thing to me. It has the elements of functionality and quality and aesthetically while not interesting is simply functional. What impresses me about Dyson is the thought that goes into the function of the product and the design of the product celebrates its function and quality as part of its aesthetic.

 

So, while you drink your smoothie think about Kitchen Aid. They also fit my definition of great design. We have a Kitchenaid Artisan counter top mixer which is very functional, great quality material and so easy to use and it looks great. It's a bit of a showpiece but when we do use it it is reliable. 

 

You are absolutely right about design is defined by the individual and what value a product brings them but if that product is produced to hit the market in the shortest period of time, use the cheapest materials available and the fit and functionality do not work well then the designers need to rethink their approach. this is, unfortunately, a prevalent approach in North America more often than not.

 

Thanks for challenging the subject Barrett. I would love to hear a retort or further the discussion. Cheers, bud!

Late_Bloomers
Late_Bloomers

 @barrettrossie  @Danny Brown Hi, Barrett, I like a challenge when I see it! I have a dog, Chica, and she sheds hair all year round (you know those dustballs which remind you of being in the middle of a desert?) and my Dyson is good at it. Eureka - I faintly remember that from school days but I have never come across a vacuum cleaner called Eureka.

 

I had a Camry ages ago and never liked it, too much plastic: some anonymous driver ruined my bumper when the car was brand new and they never managed to make it look ok again. I agree with you that Jags were a disaster and you had to have at least three of them to be able to drive one.

 

How do you define design then? For me it is the amalgam of function and form.

 

Aha, Kitchen Aid, well I say and your picture in the ABOUT at your place looks quite distinguished, do I dare a guess: designer clothes?

 

Before I seal my reputation of being a design freak let me tell you I use quite a lot of mechanical devices in my kitchen which have been in the family for decades and I love them for their practicability.

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rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @Late_Bloomers You hit it bang on Barbara. I just think your IPad will let you down. Not to say it is not well designed but consumer electronics have never been known to live a long life. That's likely dues to the speed of evolution. 

 

Don't you think Apple is manipulating consumers to make purchases in shorter cycles by changing the functionality in their products regularly? Maybe that's design manipulation not uncommon to any computer manufacturer. Different discussion but I am one to prod on occasion.

 

Thank you for your insightful contribution here!

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @timbo1973 Great to hear Tim. Hey @barrettrossie is saying the Brits can't design cars! Oh, wait, I think that was me. Not sure if that concerns you....wink, wink.....

 

if quality is what is most important to you then you can't go wrong! Thanks for dropping in and enjoy your weekend.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

Hey  @AnneReuss  Cheers, lady! I have to get that FC. I have the Secrets of Generation Flux issue waiting for me. FC is a great mag (and on-line resource) for me as a designer. I regularly search their site for ideas and inspiration.

 

You are so right about the feeling you get when something functions well and is appealing.

 

Chairs and seating are one of the most challenging things to design. I am speaking from an outside perspective but when you think about producing something that needs to work for any body type and shape, needs to feel right and has to look visually appealing there is a considerable battle there. Contract furniture struggle with bringing seating to the market because in many cases designer are very fickle and if the look is not just right then they will pass it off and if  the look is great but the cair doesn't perform then the battle has been lost.

 

That's what makes design so critical and the need for functionality, quality and aesthetic to work well together is essential to good design.

 

Thanks so much for your thoughts here!

rdopping
rdopping moderator

You nailed it  @Danny Brown  I have spouted this enough here but aesthetics are just one aspect of great design. The important thing to remember for me is simplicity which I am a big proponent of. The digital world allows us to makes things incredibly complex if we want to but it also can offer us an opportunity to iterate and innovate in ways to make product or systems much simpler that we used to be able to make them.

 

Consider that in the Architecture field we use REVIT from AutoDesk to design buildings and systems which allows us to find interferences much easier, see the building in 3 dimensions allowing us to refine poor connections and resolve massing easier and to virtually construct the building digitally which works toward eliminating costly errors in material connections and details. Truly revolutionizing the building process toward efficiency and cost containment. REVIT is an example of a great design tool. 

 

Having said that you can polish a turd but it will always still be a turd. There is no argument against great aesthetic.

 

I just wonder how you consider the design of the systems you work with and how they may be simplified to work better for your customers. Is there opportunity there somewhere?

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts here.

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @Caitlin Kelly Excellent point of view Caitlin.

 

Designers do need to advocate for design. THAT is one reason why I do what I do here but you are right it doesn't happen enough. Manufacturers can always leverage their product to showcase the importance of design as well and that may be a more viable approach than the design teams within an organization having the ability to articulate their processes to build an understanding of the importance of design.

 

The insular nature of the design community is one that is difficult to solve. Gary hustwit is just one guy who is breaking the doors open that way but you know that his firm is seen by people like me. Designers. He did an awesome job trying to relate it to everyday occurrence. Likely there is a lesson there somewhere.

 

I agree education is lacking in the arts in general. When the arts are purely elective and design principles are only offered to those with a direction towards industrial design, architecture or other arts based professions the sense of the importance of design to the general public will likely change very slowly or not at all. Teaching children the value of design is something that could be integrated in math, science, history, etc. It requires a mindset of looking at the world with the understanding that all that we see was created by someone and designed. there are even brilliant lessons is design in nature which the biomimicry profession explores. The question remains in how educators can bridge the arts with science.

 

Thanks for the thought provoking approach! 

kellysem
kellysem

 @rdopping  Change comes slowly, for sure. Although in the marketplace I don't think there are very many long term products to choose from. I was pleasantly surprised to find a kitchen faucet with (I think) a 50 year warranty, Dornbracht. What we need is to find a company (or create one) that starts with the premise "this [toaster] will last 100 years", bring it to market and see how it does in real life. The best candidates would be products whose technology doesn't change over time. 

 

Congrats on your 27 year old Kenmore. I have a couple of items that are in that age range which still function well: A Norco mountain bike c.1985 and a Sharp solar powered scientific calculator c.1980. I would gladly pay more for products with guaranteed longevity.

 

The Long Now Foundation has some interesting projects, such as a 10,000 year clock: http://longnow.org/

Jeevanjacobjohn
Jeevanjacobjohn

 @rdopping Well, it sort of differs with the place (in India, the culture within each state is entirely different, since over the course of history, each state has acted like a country (They were princely states). So, lot of that, plus invasions from other empires caused dramatic changes - like Mughal empire which introduced Arabic and Persian styles to Indian culture (well, the styles were already introduced, but with the coming of Mughal empire, the style was widely accepted and introduced to other parts of India, as supposed to just the northern India).

 

All these influences altogether form the current India (Still diverse with different within each state).

 

So, the design depends upon which state we are talking about. For instance, where I am from, the design and the products we have in my state are kind of different from what they have in a nearby state (I know it because I have lived in different states).

barrettrossie
barrettrossie

@Danny Brown @Late_Bloomers The supervisor of my wife's volunteer organization drove up to the door at their annual volunteers' banquet Thursday night in a new MKX -- it was sweet! And, it was a gift from her husband. I need to find a man like that.

barrettrossie
barrettrossie

@rdopping @Danny Brown @Late_Bloomers @Josh/ http://joshuawilner.com/ After reading some of these great comments, it's clear that design encompasses much more than aesthetics. There's also functionality, quality, performance and value to think about. Design can add to the price of something but raise the value even more. (My iPad or MacBook for instance?) And if all some design adds is aesthetic value, that's ok too, just don't trick yourself into thinking it's more than that. As far as Dyson is concerned: A few years ago I had to do some homework on Dyson vacuum cleaners for a client who thought there were design parallels with his product (in a whole different category). At that time, Dyson was very careful about what they claimed. They don't say that it works better, or that it's more powerful. Apparently they felt these were not supportable claims. They DO say that their design does not lose power over time the way traditional designs do. I have no problem with Dyson, and I'm glad people like their Dyson machines. I just hope they understand what they are getting for the premium they're paying. Now... Have you ever tried one of those Dyson hand driers at the airport? THOSE things are great. They dry your hands faster, with less noise and using less electricity. And they take up less room. Now that's great design!

rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @Late_Bloomers  @barrettrossie  @Danny Brown Longevity is a great indicator of a well made quality product. That to me equals great design. The product is made with the care and effort necessary to make it not only functional but also sustainable.

 

I will join you in the ranks of the design freaks. Present and counted!

Late_Bloomers
Late_Bloomers

 @rdopping Well, you know, Ralph, I wanted to say something nice about an American product ... just kidding, or? I have had my MacBook Pro for 5 years now, ok, it is getting annoyingly slow but still ok in its functionality and updated to the Camel or whatever the latest version is called. I have three devices of the Pear company (not counting the airport), yes I feel manipulated but not to the extent of dashing out to buy the latest mobile.

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rdopping
rdopping moderator

 @barrettrossie  @rdopping  @Danny  @Late_Bloomers There you go Barrett. Interesting on the study about Dyson. The way something holds value to you is what makes it great or not. The thing that Dyson is doing right is they are innovating with engineering. Rethinking and reinventing, hopefully for the better, simply appliances we use on a day to day basis.

 

That to me is also great design.

 

Thanks again for sharing your thoughts here. 

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